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I have recently gone from an F-Pace to a I-Pace and absolutely love it I am a convert, but my only concern is on collection of the vehicle it’s range when fully charged was around 220 miles , it’s a 3 year old HSE model bought from Hatfields in Hull it’s a used and approved vehicle, the salesman assured me that the mileage was down to the previous owners driving and it would adjust to our driving over time, is this correct ?
 

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Good luck with the new car and your health to enjoy.

You can ask for a battery health check, which will show you if there are any issues. Some degradation is possible but it should not be that much after 3 years.

If the previous owner drove it like they stole it, or drove mostly motorways then 220 is correct. My concern if the previous owner did mostly motorway miles, then they also did a lot of rapid charging. Too much rapid charging can cause more battery degradation. Though don't panic or think you bought a lemon just yet. :)

Things to do

1. Reset the GoM (From AyePace on another forum). This will reset the GoM so that it learns only your driving style and start to predict your range more accurately.
  1. Turn on the ignition, make sure the vehicle is not running (Power Mode 6Ignition on, not running)
  2. Fully depress the brake pedal.
  3. Whilst holding the brake pedal, immediately push down the accelerator pedal.
  4. Hold both pedals depressed for 10 seconds
  5. The range displayed on the dash should increase. The amount by which it increases will vary from vehicle to vehicle.
2. Drive the car the way you normally drive and take note of your efficiency. There is a handy journey tracker in the Jaguar Remote app. My overall efficiency since getting a new I-Pace two months ago is 32.8kWh/100 miles (3.05 mi/kWh). This gives me a theoretical range of 250 - 260 miles and my real range over that period is between 5% - 10% out from what the GoM reports.

3. Learn to almost totally ignore the GoM. It is a best guess only. The remaining battery state of charge is what really matters.

4. Always think with a buffer in mind UNLESS you are 100% going to make it to a 100% guaranteed working charger. When your battery capacity reaches 20% - 25% and you are nowhere near your destination, start thinking about finding a rapid.

5. Remind yourself that even 200 miles of range at average motorway speeds un the UK, is well over 3 and almost 4 hours of driving.

6. What type of driving do you do will impact range. If it is mostly mixed driving then 240 summer miles is achievable and about 200 in winter. Mostly motorway driving will knock 20 - 30 miles off those ranges (same for all EVs).

7. Remind yourself that range or charger anxiety is just a phase and you only need to do some minor planning if going on a long range trip. No different than ensuring you brought enough underwear and sunscreen.

This may all sound scary and make you think why you are going BEV. But the advantages far outweigh the disadvantages.
  • Enjoy never having to visit a fossil pump again.
  • Significantly lower running costs.
  • Smoother and more refined driving.
  • Lower emissions
 

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Hi ICDP, I keep reading on the forum about this GOM. can you explain which information on the display you are referring to?

Thanks.
 

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GOM mileage sounds right for Summer. My '68 HSE, 22" wheels, gives the same. Hasn't changed much in the 18 months I have had it. In the Winter mine goes down to 190/200. Put a roof box on and it will go down to 175 ish (Winter).
Remember the GOM is just that, an estimate. High motorway speed, bad weather, heavy right foot (fun) will all lower what you will actually get for r/l range. Driving like Miss Daisy (boring) will give you more range (15/20 miles). 70 mph on the motorway will maintain the GOM estimate.
The above figures are what I have experienced in my time driving it.

20" wheels will get better distances.
 

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GOM estimates range according to your driving style mostly motorway driving at 70 or so where you can is likely to be 220 at best. Highest range will be normal highway at 40-50 mph with gentle acceleration. Assuming you have a home charger, charge to 100% regularly to balance the cells which does not happen at lower charges.

Cold weather reduces range but so does rain, wipers, lights, heater as well as rolling resistance will cut range.
 

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Yep. As outlined above it gives a best range guess based on your most recent driving style. If you are going on a longer trip, you will learn what range to expect yourself based on the trip type planned. The rest of the time you just drive like you would any other car.
 

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I am in a similar situation - having just bought a 3 year old SE. My biggest concern though buying it from approved used is that they don't use level of charge in the EV, they use State of Health? So in the checks before buying the car, they are showing me 100% State of Health. What I don't know is how much Charge the car is still holding as a maximum. Is there a way of finding this out? The State of Health is a worry as that is how they determine if there is a warranty issue, so if this is not related to the Charge the car is holding, they are less likely to pay out against any warranty...
 

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I am in a similar situation - having just bought a 3 year old SE. My biggest concern though buying it from approved used is that they don't use level of charge in the EV, they use State of Health? So in the checks before buying the car, they are showing me 100% State of Health. What I don't know is how much Charge the car is still holding as a maximum. Is there a way of finding this out? The State of Health is a worry as that is how they determine if there is a warranty issue, so if this is not related to the Charge the car is holding, they are less likely to pay out against any warranty...
My other concern is that the car did lots of motorway miles and was charged using fast chargers a lot. Is there any way of checking this?
 

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The easiest way is to monitor your actual miles driven vs efficiency vs SoC used. There should be some discrepancy due to weather, heat loss, use of AC etc and if you do lots of trips with the car not getting up to peak efficiency.

You could go do a reasonable motorway drive to use ~25% of your battery and see how far it gets you and what your start SoC, end SoC and efficiency are. You can then use that to work out theoretical net battery capacity.

Important: Read the odometer (not the GoM) at the start and end of the trip(s) and note the total distance driven. The journey in the app may be used to total the journey but it does not record any journeys under 0.6k (or so).

For example I took some stats a week back to ascertain efficiency and actual useable range. This was over a one week period on typical mixed road trips.

Actual miles driven: 203
Efficiency: 33.1 kWh/100 miles
SoC at start 100%
SoC at end 20%

So if just over 100 miles uses 33.1kWh, then 203 = 67.2kWh
67.2 divided by 80% = 84kWh net battery capacity.

If you do this and your net capacity is under 75kWh then you may have a problem.
 

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The easiest way is to monitor your actual miles driven vs efficiency vs SoC used. There should be some discrepancy due to weather, heat loss, use of AC etc and if you do lots of trips with the car not getting up to peak efficiency.

You could go do a reasonable motorway drive to use ~25% of your battery and see how far it gets you and what your start SoC, end SoC and efficiency are. You can then use that to work out theoretical net battery capacity.

For example I took some stats a week back to ascertain efficiency and actual useable range. This was over 81 typical trips on mixed roads.

Total distance in miles: 203
Efficiency: 33.1 kWh/100 miles
SoC at start 100%
SoC at end 20%

So if just over 100 miles uses 33.1kWh, then 203 = 67.2kWh
67.2 divided by 80% = 84kWh net battery capacity.

If you do this and your net capacity is under 75kWh then you may have a problem.
Thanks @ICDP_EV,
That sounds like a great way of checking on the actual capacity of the battery at the moment. From what I read, the net battery capacity from new is around 84.somethingkWh, so yours is still retaining close to 100%.
 

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JlR dealer reset mine at a recent heater change, to a fictitious 260ml. It soon got back down to a real world 225ml or thereabouts...I do try but can never get to the low 30's kW.
 

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JlR dealer reset mine at a recent heater change, to a fictitious 260ml. It soon got back down to a real world 225ml or thereabouts...I do try but can never get to the low 30's kW.
If you do mostly motorway miles and stick to or go over UK speed limits, then you never will. I don't mean that as an insult, just setting expectations on the I-Pace. The little trip efficiency % tile in the I-Pace frequently shows 99% for me and about 85% for my wife. :)

I have personally always tended to stick to 65 - 70 on motorways, even with ICE because most of my drives are less than 50 miles. Nothing I am doing needs me to be somewhere 3 - 5 minutes earlier and ironically it has taken me twice that long to compose and post this.

On B roads I stick to max 35 - 40 on the twisty bits and 50 on the straight bits, never hitting the 60 mph "target" some people think the NSL applies sign means. Just far too many cyclists on the B roads I use.

A friend and I both had E-Tron 50s through work and he often wondered why I was getting 175 miles of range and he was getting only 150, as we both travelled the same roads home (no we don't live together :)). I pointed out that he tended to do up to 80mph on the motorway and that was killing his efficiency and only saving him about 3 minutes travel time. He also did not like me asking him to remind me how many speed awareness courses he had been on. :)

I do admit that it is hard to maintain discipline in the I-Pace due to the power and fun you can have.
 

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Good evening Steve

…”GuessOmetre” GOM… the theoretical range available given the current energy usage.
Thanks, Aurora & AndyP
 

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In my own personal experience the efficiency readout is pretty useless there is a difference between 98/99% efficiency and 55-65% efficiency but it is not a linear relationship. If I want to conserve battery I will try and set the cruise control to 77Mph which does push efficiency right up and gets a reliable 210-220 miles in a single trip, sometimes more on a good day. Cruise control removes the temptation to have fun and helps settle into the dullness. It will be a cold day in hell when I travel at less than 70Mph on a clear motorway.

If I want to have a fun drive on an empty "autobahn" peak inefficiency seems to hit about 85 MPH thereafter it seems to get better. Hitting 95-100 MPH does not seem to carry the range penalty you might expect. Sure range does decline but not dramatically it falls to about 180-190 Miles or so with consumption very rarely worse than 2.5 miles per kWh when efficiency reads as low as 57% although traffic peaks tend to prevent a sustained speed for an entire journey

I am not sad enough to spreadsheet this for consistency but have double checked a few more recent fast journey records on in control to check that I am not misrepresenting.
 
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