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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear [email protected],

The Battery Warranty on an I Pace is:

WARRANTY: 8 YEARS OR 100,000 MILES
Designed for longevity and supporting periods of sustained maximum power, I-PACE’s battery comes with an 8-year warranty and is designed to exceed the life of the car.

However, the wording on the warranty says it would be a warranty issue if the State of Health of the battery is below 70%. The State of Health on my Used 2019 Jaguar is 100%, though I'm not sure how this is possible after 32,000 miles. I have been told by Jaguar that the warranty would cover the battery if the battery capacity falls below 70%. Are these two different measures? Why not just make it simple and use battery capacity?

Is there anyone out there who has actually had their battery replaced under warranty? How bad did the battery get before it required/was able to be replaced under warranty?

I have been told by numerous members of Jaguar and Jardine that charging the car appropriately is key to maintaining the performance of the battery. However, no information is provided in the handbook or on any official Jaguar sites that I have found. The only vague information provided is that using fast chargers “too much” would be detrimental to the battery, and could therefore affect the battery and warranty.

There is seems to be discussion around various ways of operating that may be beneficial or detrimental to the battery:

Detrimental
  • Keeping the battery fully charged for long periods
  • Charging using ‘fast’ chargers - super fast being even worse
  • Charging to 100% on fast chargers - implying that charging to 80% is not detrimental?
  • Draining the battery to very low levels and charging up to 100% regularly
Beneficial
  • Charging regularly up to 80%
  • Charging on a slow charger - the slower the better?
  • Charging up to 100% and leaving it charging for the battery to optimise
Clearly, some of these suggestions are at odds with others. I would expect a prestigious company such as Jaguar to want their clients to get the best possible experience and performance from their product. I don’t see how this is possible if the optimal charging information (or at least things to avoid) is not provided.
 

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Your battery has a buffer over and above the nominal useable amount. It is designed for 1000 charges using a 100Kwh fast charger. Assuming you don't do that all the time then your battery will last even longer. Fast charging will, over time, have an impact on the total battery life, but unless there is an issue you should not really see any difference until the battery is more than 5 years old. Plus, did I mention the buffer? You actually have some redundancy already built in. Charging (slow) to 100% is not an issue - you will actually see a battery balancing effect at the end of the charge if you do this (not all the time) to show that the battery is maintaining itself.
My own experience is that I charge to 100% on my home level 2 charger regularly. When I use fast chargers I tend to only get to 80%. Mainly because that last 20% takes too long - better to drive to another charger and repeat - faster overall too. I will charge to 100% on a fast charger at a destination (to get maximum range for my return), but in 2 years I have only done that about 3 times...

Unless you are fast charging to 100% all the time you should not have any issue for the lifetime of the battery.
 

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There's a youtube video of a presentation by the I-Pace chief engineer where he is adamant that charging to 100% is not detrimintal to the battery; though he does not specify speed.

I know the battery has buffers, but I still disagree with that. And given that the 2022+ I-Pace's now suggest only charging to 80% (85%?) for normal use in the manual, it would seem that they have changed their tune on the matter. For most Li-Ion batteries the sweet spot is in the 40-60% charge range, and disproportionate degradation tends to happen at levels above 85%. Perhaps there is a top-level buffer that means the number is higher for the I-Pace, but I'd still avoid 100% on a consistent basis. I'm convinced that on some level that translates to additional battery wear. And you also lose most of your regenerative braking until you get back closer to 93%, which technically means your effective MPGe drops significantly.

I've read pretty extensively on li-ion battery degredation. My personal approach has been to avoid Level 3 chargers wherever possible, and if using them, to try to minimize the amount of charge time. I charge via Level 2 at home and cut if off at 85%. I avoid storing the car at that charging level though; e.g. I don't want it sitting at 85% for a few days at a time.
I periodically charge to 100% about every 2 months.
I've heard that trickle charging via a standard outlet promotes cell balancing, but I'm not sure if that's substantiated.

One interesting battery management antedote that I have on my 2020 is that I used to charge at a consistent 7.6khw for the first two years of ownership on my charger at home. I recently had the H295 BECM software update installed about 4 months ago, and since then I always start at 7.6khw, but after an hour or two I very consistently see a drop; typically in the 7.1 range, where it then stays constant. If I run pre-conditioning to cool the battery, it will then climb back up to 7.6 after a while. This works like clock-work.
What I've inferred from this is that the BECM update now babies the battery a bit more during charging, and reduces the charging input to protect the battery from heat. Clearly if they're doing this on a level 2 charger, and level 3 could be exponentially more detrimental from a heat standpoint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Your battery has a buffer over and above the nominal useable amount. It is designed for 1000 charges using a 100Kwh fast charger. Assuming you don't do that all the time then your battery will last even longer. Fast charging will, over time, have an impact on the total battery life, but unless there is an issue you should not really see any difference until the battery is more than 5 years old. Plus, did I mention the buffer? You actually have some redundancy already built in. Charging (slow) to 100% is not an issue - you will actually see a battery balancing effect at the end of the charge if you do this (not all the time) to show that the battery is maintaining itself.
My own experience is that I charge to 100% on my home level 2 charger regularly. When I use fast chargers I tend to only get to 80%. Mainly because that last 20% takes too long - better to drive to another charger and repeat - faster overall too. I will charge to 100% on a fast charger at a destination (to get maximum range for my return), but in 2 years I have only done that about 3 times...

Unless you are fast charging to 100% all the time you should not have any issue for the lifetime of the battery.
Thank you for your advice @bradtipp
That all seems to make sense, but it remains concerning that Jaguar do not provide any advice around charging the battery. The warranty, Jaguar direct and the dealership however state that if the battery is not charged in the 'correct' way, then the battery would not be covered under warranty...
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There's a youtube video of a presentation by the I-Pace chief engineer where he is adamant that charging to 100% is not detrimintal to the battery; though he does not specify speed.

I know the battery has buffers, but I still disagree with that. And given that the 2022+ I-Pace's now suggest only charging to 80% (85%?) for normal use in the manual, it would seem that they have changed their tune on the matter. For most Li-Ion batteries the sweet spot is in the 40-60% charge range, and disproportionate degradation tends to happen at levels above 85%. Perhaps there is a top-level buffer that means the number is higher for the I-Pace, but I'd still avoid 100% on a consistent basis. I'm convinced that on some level that translates to additional battery wear. And you also lose most of your regenerative braking until you get back closer to 93%, which technically means your effective MPGe drops significantly.

I've read pretty extensively on li-ion battery degredation. My personal approach has been to avoid Level 3 chargers wherever possible, and if using them, to try to minimize the amount of charge time. I charge via Level 2 at home and cut if off at 85%. I avoid storing the car at that charging level though; e.g. I don't want it sitting at 85% for a few days at a time.
I periodically charge to 100% about every 2 months.
I've heard that trickle charging via a standard outlet promotes cell balancing, but I'm not sure if that's substantiated.

One interesting battery management antedote that I have on my 2020 is that I used to charge at a consistent 7.6khw for the first two years of ownership on my charger at home. I recently had the H295 BECM software update installed about 4 months ago, and since then I always start at 7.6khw, but after an hour or two I very consistently see a drop; typically in the 7.1 range, where it then stays constant. If I run pre-conditioning to cool the battery, it will then climb back up to 7.6 after a while. This works like clock-work.
What I've inferred from this is that the BECM update now babies the battery a bit more during charging, and reduces the charging input to protect the battery from heat. Clearly if they're doing this on a level 2 charger, and level 3 could be exponentially more detrimental from a heat standpoint.
Thanks @BrendonSF
Again that also seems to make sense, particularly with the charging to 100% and heat elements. I generally won't need it charging up to 100% so I only plan to charge it back up fully when required for a long journey. If this is the case, it's a shame there isn't a function to set the car to stop charging when it reaches 80% say.
I have noticed that when the battery is at or close to 100%, the regenerative braking feels like it is doing less - which would make sense, but takes a bit of getting used to when you generally have regen set to high.
 
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