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No, not talking I-Pace on ICE but on solid water :) Just wondering if anyone experienced yet how I-Pace in max regen behave on ice surface. I mean if regen is up to 0,4g, that's a lot for slippery ice. Is the car then sliding out of control or kind of DSC controlling that regen doesn't try to brake too much. Usually ice max g-force is around 0,2.
 

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I haven't tested the Snow/Ice setting yet. I'd certainly start by selecting that if black ice would be a risk or driving in the snow.
Tire selection is the most critical factor when dealing with ice.
I did play with Wide Open acceleration in medium to heavy rain around corners, and with the factory All Season 20" tires, and TC/SC left ON, it was very sure footed and not excessively wimpy. Car handed in a fairly neutral fashion. I'd like to take it on a closed course in the rain and play with it after turning OFF the TC/SC systems.
 

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For driving on slippery roads there is a special driving mode, as you definitely know. I doubt high-regen is available while using that mode.
Of course you can try driving with high-regen, but I guess "JRL will not recommend it"..
 

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The regen in the I-Pace is divided into two categories. The lift off (0.2g) from the powertrain and a further 0.2g that the driver can demand by pressing the brake pedal (with the ABS ECU deciding how that's requested and delivered). The braked 0.2g is always active (and you have no way to disable this....but of course you'd never know whether it's the motors or the friction brakes applying). The 0.2g from the powertrain is selectable and is what you experience on lift off of the gas pedal and is defined in the infotainment as 'High' and 'Low' Regen.

The ABS has ultimate priority over both categories of regen braking (lift off and braked). As with any car, any wheelslip during deceleration is mitigated by the ABS ECU. The only difference with this is that the 'releasing' of the brakes is actually a cancelling of negative motor torque. This is fundamentally the same logic across all BEVs which have regenerative braking, and the requirement is that the driver shouldn't have to adopt a driving style any different to they are trained or used to (a 'normal' ICE car).

On top of this there is also some pre-control similar to Electronic Brake Distribution (EBD) on an ICE car that can adjust the initial bias split between the front and rear axles when cornering. This further helps the vehicle remain stable when lifting off on snow and ice.
 
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