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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a question,
If the Ipace battery is 90 KWh and the consumption as indicated in the catalogue is 21.2 kWh/100km WLTP, why do they announce a range of up to 480 Km WLTP?
90 KWh /21,2 kWh/100km=424,5 Km
Is this correct?
 
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Because I assume there is an amount of regeneration from braking that gives you an extended range.

So in essence 15% extra range from regen.

In addition it's how you drive. If you drive at @80km/h you'll get 480km ... if you drive at 130km/h you'll get a lot less range .. probably around 350+km
 

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The WLTP states how many kilometers you should be able to drive if you keep repeating a very specific cylce of accelerations, stops, cruising distances at certain speeds, under specific conditions (temperature, road, usage of onboard electronics and heating/cooling, etc). It is in no way a realistic estimate, as you calculated. If your typical drive is a few km to get to the highway, and then a long drive at 100km/h, you wont get nearly as far - and it becomes exponentially worse at even higher speeds. I have found (having driven 160.000 km with a BEV) that the EPA standard used in america is more realistic, and can actually be achieved if you know you need the range. Drive it like the powerful fun car that it is, though, and your range will be about 20% below EPA, (30% in cold weather)

Also take into account that not all 90kWh are available to you; when you do calculations like that, assume 85kWh or even less.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I understand the fact that like on combustion cars, the range depends of many elements, like type of conduction, type of road...
I searched also on the net if WLTP considers the regeneration, but I was no able to found any literature on that.
What I still no understand, is why Jaguar announces a range of 480Km when 90 KWh /21,2 kWh/100km=424,5 Km
The only plausible answer is the regeneration.
 

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Why is this a mystery?

1. The battery has a stated capacity of 90kWh (which is presumably rated at a certain discharge rate)

2. The 21.2kWh/100km is presumably calculated under specified conditions of speed, temperature, load, wheel size etc etc But this will power consumption will vary with many factors including speed, driving style etc and could lie between eg 150-250kWh/100km on different occasions.

So there's no reason that the two values will agree exactly. But yes I'm sure that regen is one important reason for differences.

And then the 'official' range will be calculated using some other defined set of parameters.
 

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Hi,

From EV database: (https://ev-database.uk/car/1097/Jaguar-I-Pace)

Real Energy Consumption between 235 - 485 Wh/mi (bigger is worse)

City - Cold Weather 340 Wh/mi
Highway - Cold Weather 485 Wh/mi
Combined - Cold Weather 400 Wh/mi

City - Mild Weather 235 Wh/mi
Highway - Mild Weather 375 Wh/mi
Combined - Mild Weather 300 Wh/mi

Indication of real-world energy use in several situations. Cold weather: 'worst-case' based on -10°C and use of heating. Mild weather: 'best-case' based on 23°C and no use of A/C. The energy use will depend on speed, style of driving, climate and route conditions.

Assuming usable 80KWh range varies (according to conditions/driving style etc.) between 165 (485Wh/mi) and 340 (235 Wh/mi) miles.

I am still slightly confused by above as batteries are (meant to be) temperature controlled so why the big effect of external temperature?

Cheers,
 
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DRCayenne said:
I am still slightly confused by above as batteries are (meant to be) temperature controlled so why the big effect of external temperature?
Batteries prefer 20-24deg C.

Therefore the combination of air and battery use, they will either be heated or cooled. Either way the battery will be using a % of the power to do the cooling / heating.

In addition in hot/cold weather the driver will have the heating/cooling on ... again increasing your consumption.
 

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Code:
Therefore the combination of air and battery use, they will either be heated or cooled. Either way the battery will be using a % of the power to do the cooling / heating.

In addition in hot/cold weather the driver will have the heating/cooling on ... again increasing your consumption.
Hi,

From iPace site:
Code:
"EXTREME TEMPERATURES

Extreme low and high temperatures impact upon how well a battery can maintain its level of charge.

I-PACE features sophisticated thermal management systems which help to keep the battery at its optimal temperature and minimise the impact of outside temperatures on the car's range.
Using power warms batteries so when it is cold......use will 'warm' batteries and ambient cold air (no power) will help cool batteries.
When it is warm batteries will require cooling....ambient air and power

Use of air con requires power both to heat and cool etc.

So in BOTH cases power will be required for either heating or cooling hence my confusion as the effects of external temperature on temp internal temp controlled battery efficiency seems excessive.

One way round this problem is to use the battery pre-conditioning app which can add between 31 and 62 miles (https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/motor-shows-geneva-motor-show/2018-jaguar-i-pace-395bhp-ev-revealed ).

Cheers,
 

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johnd said:
Presumably this doesn't involve magic, but requires that the car is still connected to the charger, so using eg mains power rather than the car's own battery power for the temperature 'pre-conditioning'?
Yes, uses mains instead. Battery and car interior at optimal temp before you leave charger. Therefor max possible ramge, and minimising effect of temperature extremes on range
 
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