Jaguar I-Pace Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have anybody experienced that their I-Pace Jaguar cannot load with more than max 50 KWH .. have tried all options, levels etc etc. but it will not work ? .. and the dealer cannot explain as well. It is a model 2021, hence should be able to load 100 KwH under good conditions. Cheers Jsper
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
510 Posts
There are many factors that influence the charging rate. The main one is battery temperature and initial battery SOC.
During my last trip, battery temp was only +7c, and initial SOC was 22%, and I was only able to get 48-49kw max. So I guess you were in the same condition. The battery need to be in the +17-20c and soc around 5% to get 100kw. If initial SOC is in 10-30%, you will get 82kw max (number from my personal experience, not from JLR).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
I managed to get 100kW from 10 - 30% last week, but that’s an exception. Indeed, if the battery temp is below 20, forget anything above 50kW
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
It is worth noting that some a charging hubs such as Instavolt at Banbury on the M4 are listed as 125kW but this is only available if the paired charger is not being used. Individual chargers are actually rated at 65kW. Therefore if all chargers are in use you will not be able to obtain anywhere near 100kW. I was there last Sunday afternoon when all chargers were in use and only charged for the main part at around 47kW. When the hub has been quiet I have seen around 70kW.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There are many factors that influence the charging rate. The main one is battery temperature and initial battery SOC.
During my last trip, battery temp was only +7c, and initial SOC was 22%, and I was only able to get 48-49kw max. So I guess you were in the same condition. The battery need to be in the +17-20c and soc around 5% to get 100kw. If initial SOC is in 10-30%, you will get 82kw max (number from my personal experience, not from JLR).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks, but sorry, there is no way to arrive at 5 % on the highways around Europe... you need more to get to the next stop if the charger is not working, or fully occupied, which is often the case, based on recent trip from Denmark to Italy and back again .. . . you need to have 20-30 % min .. as safeguard. The company promise that 100 KwH is possible, there are figures to show that this is possible between 40-80 % etc etc .etc. ..but I have never experienced more than 55 KWH and this has even been with a warmed up battery , and in temperatures of around 20 C. Cheers Jesper (somebody has promised too much, and the setting of the batteries is too conservative, compared to e.g. Audit e-tron, which uses the same. Jesper
There are many factors that influence the charging rate. The main one is battery temperature and initial battery SOC.
During my last trip, battery temp was only +7c, and initial SOC was 22%, and I was only able to get 48-49kw max. So I guess you were in the same condition. The battery need to be in the +17-20c and soc around 5% to get 100kw. If initial SOC is in 10-30%, you will get 82kw max (number from my personal experience, not from JLR).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There are many factors that influence the charging rate. The main one is battery temperature and initial battery SOC.
During my last trip, battery temp was only +7c, and initial SOC was 22%, and I was only able to get 48-49kw max. So I guess you were in the same condition. The battery need to be in the +17-20c and soc around 5% to get 100kw. If initial SOC is in 10-30%, you will get 82kw max (number from my personal experience, not from JLR).
But there is no way you can drive around - long distance trips . in Europe with the plan to go down to 10 % before charging, and then you are trapped .. ! . . second, the promise is 100 KWH, and this was the change from previously 50... and false marketing "
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I managed to get 100kW from 10 - 30% last week, but that’s an exception. Indeed, if the battery temp is below 20, forget anything above 50kW
Yes, to avoid that the guarantee on the batteries are used .. they seems to have put the batteries at a very very low setting.. which is not possible then on long distance trips !.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
510 Posts
We heard many "rumors" about JLR pushing an update and allow better charging performance after renegociating the warranty contract with LG (after Audi was able to get a better deal for a pretty close pack with LG for the e-tron)... I am still waiting for this update....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
We heard many "rumors" about JLR pushing an update and allow better charging performance after renegociating the warranty contract with LG (after Audi was able to get a better deal for a pretty close pack with LG for the e-tron)... I am still waiting for this update....
THanks - and yes, it is about costs of warranties .. as a smaller company, it is expensive for Jaguar .. hence they seems to have used a very conservative setting, which damage possibilities for longer trips... - with the waiting time, you can max do 600 km or so per day driven long distance through Europe, + you miss a couple of family parties in even a small country like Denmark as you are late.. due to long term charging time !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
There are many factors that influence the charging rate. The main one is battery temperature and initial battery SOC.
During my last trip, battery temp was only +7c, and initial SOC was 22%, and I was only able to get 48-49kw max. So I guess you were in the same condition. The battery need to be in the +17-20c and soc around 5% to get 100kw. If initial SOC is in 10-30%, you will get 82kw max (number from my personal experience, not from JLR).
Today, Jaguar workshop told me that I have to go down to 5-10
There are many factors that influence the charging rate. The main one is battery temperature and initial battery SOC.
During my last trip, battery temp was only +7c, and initial SOC was 22%, and I was only able to get 48-49kw max. So I guess you were in the same condition. The battery need to be in the +17-20c and soc around 5% to get 100kw. If initial SOC is in 10-30%, you will get 82kw max (number from my personal experience, not from JLR).
Today, Jaguar Workshop told me that I have to go down to 5-10 % level and then charge.... as they do in Norway where there are many I-Pace, but there is no option for this driven long distance, as you risk to be stocked somewhere on the highway!.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Today, Jaguar workshop told me that I have to go down to 5-10

Today, Jaguar Workshop told me that I have to go down to 5-10 % level and then charge.... as they do in Norway where there are many I-Pace, but there is no option for this driven long distance, as you risk to be stocked somewhere on the highway!.
Hei Jesper,
I have done a few longer trips with the I-Pace this summer 800-1000 km each time without any real issues. The overall difference for trips of that length compared to an ICE is about 10-20% longer in time in my experience. In winter temperatures this becomes less predictable. If you have a longer trip in winter it´s worth setting off with the battery preconditioned (the car should have reached 100% SoC several hours before your set departure time). If you drive at highway speed to your first charging stop the battery should still be reasonably warm, and the time taken for the car to reach the optimum battery temperature for charging will be shorter.
If you use the Pivi Nav then it generally tries to insert a charging stop at around 10-20% SoC. If the charging station stalls become occupied it reroutes to an available charger (at least this is the behaviour I have seen here in Germany routing to an EnBW charger with 2 CCS which became fully occupied shortly before arrival).

The ABRP app is very useful since you can set and plan the minimum charge you want to arrive at your charging stop and destination. I normally set it to 15% at the charger. The combination of ABRP, Apple CarPlay, and an OBD dongle provides much more insight (in particular you have access to the battery temperature) and confidence about your planned charging stops. You can also define that the minimum number of stalls for your charging stop (4 is a good value).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
727 Posts
If Jaguar increase the temperature tolerances is the battery cooling system capable of keeping the heat under control, all the European brands seem to use the same, or very similar battery packs. Is it just temperature control or is there more involved.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hei Jesper,
I have done a few longer trips with the I-Pace this summer 800-1000 km each time without any real issues. The overall difference for trips of that length compared to an ICE is about 10-20% longer in time in my experience. In winter temperatures this becomes less predictable. If you have a longer trip in winter it´s worth setting off with the battery preconditioned (the car should have reached 100% SoC several hours before your set departure time). If you drive at highway speed to your first charging stop the battery should still be reasonably warm, and the time taken for the car to reach the optimum battery temperature for charging will be shorter.
If you use the Pivi Nav then it generally tries to insert a charging stop at around 10-20% SoC. If the charging station stalls become occupied it reroutes to an available charger (at least this is the behaviour I have seen here in Germany routing to an EnBW charger with 2 CCS which became fully occupied shortly before arrival).

The ABRP app is very useful since you can set and plan the minimum charge you want to arrive at your charging stop and destination. I normally set it to 15% at the charger. The combination of ABRP, Apple CarPlay, and an OBD dongle provides much more insight (in particular you have access to the battery temperature) and confidence about your planned charging stops. You can also define that the minimum number of stalls for your charging stop (4 is a good value).
Thanks for the advice on ABRP... Yes. re. the car, we sometimes during the trip from DK - Italy and back again charged before the GPS system from the car advised us to do... ... however, I still find that to go down to e.g. 5, 10 or even 15 % poses a risk for being stocked ... if you do not know the country well... (and as several charging stations along the highway had challenges ..). Cheers jesper
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Today, Jaguar workshop told me that I have to go down to 5-10

Today, Jaguar Workshop told me that I have to go down to 5-10 % level and then charge.... as they do in Norway where there are many I-Pace, but there is no option for this driven long distance, as you risk to be stocked somewhere on the highway!.
I-Pace is not a charging champion and especially when it is cold but I hope the conservative strategy of Jaguar will increase the longevity of my battery. I have no problem reaching 100kW charging at SOC lower than 40% when the battery is warm but it may be as low as 20kW when it is cold. However it is important that you turn off and leave the car, it cannot heat your butt and the battery at the same time. You need to allow it to heat the battery to accept higher charging power.

My first charging experience was at -20c and I sat inside warming the cabin, absolutely no charge reached the battery as the charge power was too low to self heat the battery. Now with car off and active heating it fares much better.

If I venture on a longer trip winter time and need to charge underway I precondition and warm the battery to make sure it has some temperature when I stop to have lunch (and charge).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29 Posts
I haven’t charged on 100kW+ that many times but saw 100kW in the summer which fell to 84kW after a while. I think I was quite low that time so matches the above. Recently during the winter I haven’t seen more than 55kW despite having driven for a couple of hours at motorway speed. I guess that doesn’t heat the battery sufficiently. I can wait a few mins if it’s better for the battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
I-Pace is not a charging champion and especially when it is cold but I hope the conservative strategy of Jaguar will increase the longevity of my battery. I have no problem reaching 100kW charging at SOC lower than 40% when the battery is warm but it may be as low as 20kW when it is cold. However it is important that you turn off and leave the car, it cannot heat your butt and the battery at the same time. You need to allow it to heat the battery to accept higher charging power.

My first charging experience was at -20c and I sat inside warming the cabin, absolutely no charge reached the battery as the charge power was too low to self heat the battery. Now with car off and active heating it fares much better.

If I venture on a longer trip winter time and need to charge underway I precondition and warm the battery to make sure it has some temperature when I stop to have lunch (and charge).
When you connect the car to a HPC at lower temperatures does the car actively heat the battery or is the battery heating effect purely derived from the high current of DC charging combined with the internal resistance of the traction battery?

We had a trip in the Alps last weekend and I stopped to top up the battery on a 50 kW charger starting at about 40%. The ambient temperature was -2 C and the battery starting temperature was around 15 C. I monitored the battery temperature during charging (HVAC off). The car was drawing about 45 kW until the battery temperature reached 19-20 C, then the charging rate went up very close to 50 kW. The battery warmed at a rate of about 1 C every 2-3 minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
770 Posts
Some thoughs on this issue.
Yes, the I-Pace is not a charging speed champion but in my experience I had no problem in getting an average speed of 90kw in summer at any HPC station (MY21 and battery above 25C).
In winter is worse of course but it's the same for any EV (Tesla being an exception because of its ability to pre heat the battery) and it can affect the 1st charge of a trip. In my experience the following ones are at summer speed since the 1st charge heats up the battery quite a lot and, unless you're in very cold climate, the battery will hold pretty much the temperature.
I got back fom the Alps a week ago, the intial part of the trip at -10C then gradually warming up to 2C. First charge begun at 30kw but ended at 60kw (and 45C on the battery). The following 2 charges were at 110 - 50kw in the soc range of 10-80%.

As I already posted, I learned that HVAC will heat up the pattery only if the car has been switched off, it's not enough to turn off the climate while charging.

Then call me crazy, but I set ABRP to get with 7% of SOC at the charger if I'm poining to a multi stall charging (with realtime occupation info from ABRP) station and/or if there is a 11/22kw AC charging point nearby. The probablity that all of them will be off are really low and begin a charging session below 10% will help a lot the charging speed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
510 Posts
This is why , IF IT IS SAFE TO DO IT, you can do 10 min of yo-yo before the charger (alternate quick acceleration and high regen) and gain +20c on battery. I don't when the brake light at the back start to light in regen mode ? as soon as you release the accelerator pedal, or is there so delay ? Usually I try to do this yo-yo when no one is behind me, I don't want to scare him with flashing break light on the highway. But if I know that there is some delay, I will be manage to warm up the battery without lighting the break light. I should ask my wife to follow me with her Leaf , to test this, in real time.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top