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Hi - I have a 2020 model and going to the West Country. A question - what is the fastest charge kw/hour have people achieved in respect of public chargers. Aiming to top up at 100+ kw/hour points. Need to understand if this would be ok
 

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There are many threads on this subject. The advice is good but there is a lot of it!!
100 kWh rate of charge is the max (ish) you can expect under ideal conditions.
You probably won't achieve that. Charging rate is affected by battery temp, outside air temp, state of charge (SOC), available local electricity rate of supply, the charge rating of your chosen charge point and many other issues.
If battery temp is in the mid-20s, outside air temp above 10 deg (?) and SOC down at 20% you would most likely get 100 kWh charge rate to start with. As soon as the battery temp gets too hot, even with the cooling, and/or the SOC passes 40% (ish) it will probably drop to 80 kWh (ish). That will probably decrease steadily as the SOC approaches 80%, where will probably go down to 35 kWh (ish). It takes much longer to charge between 80 and 100%.
The above figures will vary.
When you get to your charge point, you may have to queue. Your battery will probably not be at the optimum temp, outside air temp will not be optimum, don't know what your SOC will be.
In all probability you will get somewhere between 80 and 35 kWh charge rate.

Some people will have obtained the figures above, some will get better figures and some will have got worse.

Good luck.

Hope I haven't offended the "h" mafia. "Horse heads in the bed" type stuff. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There are many threads on this subject. The advice is good but there is a lot of it!!
100 kWh rate of charge is the max (ish) you can expect under ideal conditions.
You probably won't achieve that. Charging rate is affected by battery temp, outside air temp, state of charge (SOC), available local electricity rate of supply, the charge rating of your chosen charge point and many other issues.
If battery temp is in the mid-20s, outside air temp above 10 deg (?) and SOC down at 20% you would most likely get 100 kWh charge rate to start with. As soon as the battery temp gets too hot, even with the cooling, and/or the SOC passes 40% (ish) it will probably drop to 80 kWh (ish). That will probably decrease steadily as the SOC approaches 80%, where will probably go down to 35 kWh (ish). It takes much longer to charge between 80 and 100%.
The above figures will vary.
When you get to your charge point, you may have to queue. Your battery will probably not be at the optimum temp, outside air temp will not be optimum, don't know what your SOC will be.
In all probability you will get somewhere between 80 and 35 kWh charge rate.

Some people will have obtained the figures above, some will get better figures and some will have got worse.

Good luck.

Hope I haven't offended the "h" mafia. "Horse heads in the bed" type stuff. :)
Many thanks
 

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Hi Geoff,

Tall Phil is absolutely right. I don't believe that outside temp matters, is the only nuance I may add.

Anyway, if you want to plan a long drive, the best advice is to install A Better Route Planner (ABRP). Reduce în ABRP the <Reference Consumption @ 110km/h> for the I-Pace from the default 262 to around 220Wh/km. ABRP will propose charging stops where needed and estimate their duration. I find these estimates to be quite accurate.
 

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The last time I used a public charger it's quoted power output was 150KWh.

My achieved rate was never greater than 32WKh over approx 1 hour of charging (starting at about 60% SOC).

I have achieved much faster rates from 50KWh chargers. In other words, take the published figures with a pinch of salt!
 

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One other thing to remember the stated maximum output of a charger is only that, the absolute maximum. If there is a bank of chargers, they will all be sharing the same main electrical supply and depending on its capacity that is the maximum the group of chargers can output concurrently.

As an example, if a site is supplied with a 1 MW mains feed and has say 6 x 350kW chargers you would only get the maximum if only 2 of them were in use (at maximum) as 2 x 350kW = 700kW (or 0.7MW), whereas 3 x chargers (at maximum output) would require 1.05MW (max actual available for 3 evenly balanced chargers is 333kW), 4 x chargers would require 1.4MW (max actual available for 4 evenly balanced chargers is 250kW), and so on.

The above figures assume no power losses or overheads for the charging equipment, cooling, etc. which in reality there would be.

Looking at some of the sub-stations adjacent to charging stations, where there is information posted, it is quite apparent that the supply does not equate to the maximum output of all chargers on site running concurrently. Running systems with contention is not uncommon, where the systems can self-regulate to keep the maximum draw on resources below the maximum supply. Your home broadband works on the same principle, I.e. not all users will want their full maximum bandwidth at the same time.

The use of contention works well most of the time unless there is a requirement for most of the connected devices to want at or close to their maximums at the same time. I suspect this may occur at motorway charging stations on bank holidays where all the charging points at stations are almost continuously in use with people charging from 20 - 80% concurrently.

Moral of the story, either don't travel on bank holidays, or travel really early or really late, or only charge at sites with less than 50% of the charge points in use :)

If you have a current clamp on the incoming live cable to your house from your home charger this performs a similar function. It ensures that the house requirements are met by turning down the home charger output to ensure the total power (or in this case current) being passed through the house main supply input fuse is kept below its rating, this is so you do not lose the electric supply to your complete house and charger.

Hopefully not teaching granny to suck eggs ;)


Edit..
P.S., I'm a retired engineer, does it show 😇
 
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350kw chargers are not relevant to IPace drivers the best you are likely to get Is 80KW or so between 20 and 80% charge, no guarantees. All I want is a 50kw charger that is working, more than that is bonus.
 

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The last time I used a public charger it's quoted power output was 150KWh.

My achieved rate was never greater than 32WKh over approx 1 hour of charging (starting at about 60% SOC).

I have achieved much faster rates from 50KWh chargers. In other words, take the published figures with a pinch of salt!
I agree, my experience is that it does not matter whether you use a fast or a 50 KWH charger.. your max is about the same.. . - hence I am wondering why Jaguar says that it can go to 100.... - have not experienced more than 57 under all conditions ..
 

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Not sure how this compares with other MY21+ owners with a potential max charge rate of 150Kwh.

I have seen a maximum of 117Kwh charge rate. I generally get a consistent 50Kwh from reliable 50Kwh chargers throughout the charge cycle. At reliable 150Kwh chargers I typically see an average of 80Kwh throughout the charge cycle.

I would like this to be better but broadly find it to be acceptable.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks to all the responses- I did manage about 90kw per hour on a 150 charger. Also managed about 40 on most 50kw chargers. Experience was good. InstaVolt was very easy
 

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I generally get a consistent 50Kwh from reliable 50Kwh chargers throughout the charge cycle. At reliable 150Kwh chargers I typically see an average of 80Kwh throughout the charge cycle.
This is exactly what I can see with my MY19. I rarely stop with 5-10% of SOC, because I keep some buffer for plan B in case of trouble, so I rarely get 100kw+, but in good temp condition, I always get 82kw max up to 30% of SOC.
 
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