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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought to share the experience I had in choosing and running new tyres.

About 6 months ago my original Goodyear tyres were done, after a good 40 thousand km. After quite some consideration I landed with the Pirelli Scorpion Zero All Season in 255/50 R20, largely based on the promise of their tyre labelling: A-B-A supposedly means very quiet, good wet traction, very low rolling resistance.
(Note that 2 versions of this particular tyre exist, the "right" ones are the 109W LR, designed specifically for the new LR Defender.)

Now, with 10 thousand km of experience, I am happy to share that those promises were not lies...

The tyres are quiet indeed, traction is fine (good enough for 2 skiing trips to Austria without any issue, in fact). But most impressed I am by their rolling resistance.
I observe a reduction of at least 1.5kWh/100km (or 2.5/100miles) compared to the Good Years. To put that in perspective, that is an efficiency improvement of around 9%, as if WLTP range increased with 40km, or as if the battery capacity grew from 90kWh to 98kWh... Qualifies for "pretty spectacular" in my book :cool:

I always felt that Jaguar did really well with the I-Pace, but they cut a few corners that they should not have cut.
One is that they took the wheels (mostly) from existing car series, making them look cool but creating high drag. Aerodynamic drag of the wheels+tyres accounts for about 25% of the entire vehicle drag, so it does really matter. That is why almost all EVs nowadays have specific wheels, far more closed than traditional alloys.
The other shortcut that Jaguar should not have taken, are the tyres. The OEM tyres chosen by Jaguar are not bad, typically they have a B label for rolling resistance. But for EVs, selecting A label tyres should be a no-brainer. Fortunately, this is an issue that we can fix as soon as the first set of tyres are worn out.

In short: I advise to pay attention to rolling resistance when choosing new rubber. It really matters!

For the moment there are not that many options in "our" sizes, but there is quite some progress. I'll try and share some findings
 

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I thought the 20" I-Pace tyre sizes were 245/50/R20, so by going 255 are you not adding rolling resistance. If you had went 245 on the same tyres you may reduce rolling resitance even more?
 

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I've noticed same when changing winter Nokian R2 to OEM Goodyear for summer. Those Nokian are 1-2kWh/100km more efficient than GY.
 

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Indeed, the wheels look good which is a rarity with EVs.

I was incidentally going to post a thread about the tyres seeing as it’s getting time to change them. I would like to stick with summer tyres and ideally some that can be pushed a bit. Usually “performance oriented“ and “efficient” don’t go hand in hand. Do you guys have any recommendations? A bit more efficiency would always be good of course.
 

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I thought to share the experience I had in choosing and running new tyres.

About 6 months ago my original Goodyear tyres were done, after a good 40 thousand km. After quite some consideration I landed with the Pirelli Scorpion Zero All Season in 255/50 R20, largely based on the promise of their tyre labelling: A-B-A supposedly means very quiet, good wet traction, very low rolling resistance.
(Note that 2 versions of this particular tyre exist, the "right" ones are the 109W LR, designed specifically for the new LR Defender.)

Now, with 10 thousand km of experience, I am happy to share that those promises were not lies...

The tyres are quiet indeed, traction is fine (good enough for 2 skiing trips to Austria without any issue, in fact). But most impressed I am by their rolling resistance.
I observe a reduction of at least 1.5kWh/100km (or 2.5/100miles) compared to the Good Years. To put that in perspective, that is an efficiency improvement of around 9%, as if WLTP range increased with 40km, or as if the battery capacity grew from 90kWh to 98kWh... Qualifies for "pretty spectacular" in my book :cool:

I always felt that Jaguar did really well with the I-Pace, but they cut a few corners that they should not have cut.
One is that they took the wheels (mostly) from existing car series, making them look cool but creating high drag. Aerodynamic drag of the wheels+tyres accounts for about 25% of the entire vehicle drag, so it does really matter. That is why almost all EVs nowadays have specific wheels, far more closed than traditional alloys.
The other shortcut that Jaguar should not have taken, are the tyres. The OEM tyres chosen by Jaguar are not bad, typically they have a B label for rolling resistance. But for EVs, selecting A label tyres should be a no-brainer. Fortunately, this is an issue that we can fix as soon as the first set of tyres are worn out.

In short: I advise to pay attention to rolling resistance when choosing new rubber. It really matters!

For the moment there are not that many options in "our" sizes, but there is quite some progress. I'll try and share some findings
Did you mean 245/50/R20? Or did you get new wheels as well?
 

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I believe he's referring to these tyres: Pirelli Tyres / All Season Car / Pirelli Scorpion Zero All Season NCS Noise Control System - 255/50 R20 109W XL (LR) SI RP TL Fuel Eff.: A Wet Grip: B NoiseClass: 1 Noise: 69dB All Season - Four Season - All Weather - Car/MPV Tyres - 20" R20" - 255/50/20, 255/50R20 <span class="col00f">OE Jaguar/LandRover</span>

I guess it's possible to fit 255's? The circumference will be slightly different to OEM as well so the speedo/odometer will be slightly off around 10-15% which may well explain the calculated range improvement. The car may well think the car has travelled further than it actually has. Or it's the other way around so it's much better range but sounds suspiciously similar.
 

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This tyre isn't available in the original size as far as I could find, so I think the size the OP mentioned would be the closest choice.
It gives identical rolling diameter, 762mm to the OEM tyre for 22inch wheels (only 1.4% larger than the standard 752mm, not 10-15%) so no issues there.
I suspect that fitting a 255 onto the rim designed for 245 would be fine, so the only thing that might be an issue is clearance to the suspension components gets reduced by 5mm.

Does anyone have any experience of fitting the 255 width to the standard 20 inch rims?
 

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I'm mostly curious how it affects handling and feel. I'm assuming they're more squishy than the GE F1's and perhaps more comfortable? If they're the OEM tyre for the Defender it's quite a different vehicle.

I did a bit of googling on tyres and the Pirelli P Zero Elec gets good reports from the Taycan folks. It's not eco tyre, though - I think possibly worse than the Goodyear's - but not available for the I-Pace anyhow. So maybe Pirelli is where it's at...
 

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I thought to share the experience I had in choosing and running new tyres.

About 6 months ago my original Goodyear tyres were done, after a good 40 thousand km. After quite some consideration I landed with the Pirelli Scorpion Zero All Season in 255/50 R20, largely based on the promise of their tyre labelling: A-B-A supposedly means very quiet, good wet traction, very low rolling resistance.
(Note that 2 versions of this particular tyre exist, the "right" ones are the 109W LR, designed specifically for the new LR Defender.)

Now, with 10 thousand km of experience, I am happy to share that those promises were not lies...

The tyres are quiet indeed, traction is fine (good enough for 2 skiing trips to Austria without any issue, in fact). But most impressed I am by their rolling resistance.
I observe a reduction of at least 1.5kWh/100km (or 2.5/100miles) compared to the Good Years. To put that in perspective, that is an efficiency improvement of around 9%, as if WLTP range increased with 40km, or as if the battery capacity grew from 90kWh to 98kWh... Qualifies for "pretty spectacular" in my book :cool:

I always felt that Jaguar did really well with the I-Pace, but they cut a few corners that they should not have cut.
One is that they took the wheels (mostly) from existing car series, making them look cool but creating high drag. Aerodynamic drag of the wheels+tyres accounts for about 25% of the entire vehicle drag, so it does really matter. That is why almost all EVs nowadays have specific wheels, far more closed than traditional alloys.
The other shortcut that Jaguar should not have taken, are the tyres. The OEM tyres chosen by Jaguar are not bad, typically they have a B label for rolling resistance. But for EVs, selecting A label tyres should be a no-brainer. Fortunately, this is an issue that we can fix as soon as the first set of tyres are worn out.

In short: I advise to pay attention to rolling resistance when choosing new rubber. It really matters!

For the moment there are not that many options in "our" sizes, but there is quite some progress. I'll try and share some findings
I ran my I Pace on 255 tyres and they were much better than the OEM 245's. Slight range improvement, noticeably quieter and a better ride. I changed because my mother in law moaned about the hard ride in the rear seats and I hoped a tyre change would help. It did too, but it didn't stop the whingeing. Only duct tape would do that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I thought the 20" I-Pace tyre sizes were 245/50/R20, so by going 255 are you not adding rolling resistance. If you had went 245 on the same tyres you may reduce rolling resitance even more?
Well, no.

A bit counterintuitively, rolling resistance is not at all determined by the tyre width. The resistance comes from the deformation of the tyre shoulder. All else being equal, a wider tyre will actually have a marginally lower rolling resistance, because it deforms less; though it will also have a marginally higher wind resistance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm mostly curious how it affects handling and feel. I'm assuming they're more squishy than the GE F1's and perhaps more comfortable? If they're the OEM tyre for the Defender it's quite a different vehicle.

I did a bit of googling on tyres and the Pirelli P Zero Elec gets good reports from the Taycan folks. It's not eco tyre, though - I think possibly worse than the Goodyear's - but not available for the I-Pace anyhow. So maybe Pirelli is where it's at...
It is quite hard to comment on the handling, as I would compare with the completely worn Goodyears...
These Pirellis seem slightly more comfy and steer less directly, but as a keen driver I'd say that the differences are minor.
Wet grip is excellent (but again, actually comparing with worn OEMs). Even on snow they were surprisingly capable.
 
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