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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Did you consider to change the mag/wheel as well. Here, there is a local company who sell mag specifically for EV (Fast Wheels | Canada’s Leading Direct Fit, Performance Alloy Wheels) and they pretend that they can increase range by 4.4%
Hi Dernotte,
I did look into that, sure.

The issue is that new wheels cost a lot more than you would ever dream to save... And typically the aero designs are rather fugly.
That said, the ones you referenced aren't half bad. And neither absurdly expensive, though with taxes and import duties they would end up over 2000 😯

Tyres are a different matter. They wear and need replacing anyway, so we can undo one significant shortcut that Jaguar made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
[Q
I believe he's referring to these tyres: Pirelli Tyres / All Season Car / Pirelli Scorpion Zero All Season NCS Noise Control System - 255/50 R20 109W XL (LR) SI RP TL Fuel Eff.: A Wet Grip: B NoiseClass: 1 Noise: 69dB All Season - Four Season - All Weather - Car/MPV Tyres - 20" R20" - 255/50/20, 255/50R20 <span class="col00f">OE Jaguar/LandRover</span>
I guess it's possible to fit 255's? The circumference will be slightly different to OEM as well so the speedo/odometer will be slightly off around 10-15% which may well explain the calculated range improvement. The car may well think the car has travelled further than it actually has. Or it's the other way around so it's much better range but sounds suspiciously similar.
Indeed, those are the ones. I had to hammer the local tyre specialist, as the best price he could offer them for was €380 each. Online I found them at 240, so in the end the tyre specialist had to go out of his comfort zone and order them differently (?). He managed.

As the 255s are taller than the 245s, the distance travelled as reported by the 🐱 is 1.45% less than it used to be - or about 3% less than reality, because the OEM setup was already underreporting with 1.5%.

Consequently, consumption per km or mile as reported by the car is now 3% higher than reality, not lower.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I also want to know how OP got 40,000km out of the Goodyears!! Mine are about done at 15,000miles (24,000km). Heavy right foot I guess:p
Very tempted by these Pirellis.
At least 70% of my driving is up&down to schools and work, traffic jammed grind... My average speed barely gets over 40kmh/25mph.
That may positively affect tyre mileage 😎

I've read reports of people eeking out over 60t km from a set of Goodyears, nearly 40T miles...
 

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I'm a bit confused, why are 255/50/R20 tires 1cm taller than 245/50/R20?

How does the slightly bigger width affect height, if profile and radius remain the same?

Or is it just that it happens these Pirellis are a bit taller than the OEM Goodyears?
 

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thanks for the review and recommendations. One thing to note for those of us in Western-Europe: although the tires are labeled “all-season”, they do NOT have the “3 peaks and a snowflake mark”, which means they do not satisfy the requirements that some countries have on running winter tires during wintertime.

While I don’t want to argue the OPs post that these are fine to go to Austria, you might not be legally allowed to do so, based on the route you take.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
thanks for the review and recommendations. One thing to note for those of us in Western-Europe: although the tires are labeled “all-season”, they do NOT have the “3 peaks and a snowflake mark”, which means they do not satisfy the requirements that some countries have on running winter tires during wintertime.

While I don’t want to argue the OPs post that these are fine to go to Austria, you might not be legally allowed to do so, based on the route you take.
"Not legally allowed" is a bit strong. I promise that I did not break any law :)

All countries have their own rules, like:
In Austria, you need winter tyres only when the road you take has snow or ice on it. Winter tryes are defined as M+S rated. You must also carry snow chains (in the boot) from November through March.
In Germany you need winter tyres only when the road you take is iced. Winter tryes are defined as 3MPSF rated, though until October '24, M+S are legal too. You must carry snow chains for a number of mountain passes.
In France, for many departments you need to have winter tyres from 1st November to 1st March. M+S tyres are accepted until October'24, beyond that they must be 3MPSF. Carrying snow chains (in the boot) meets compliance needs as well.
Etc
 

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I thought to share the experience I had in choosing and running new tyres.

About 6 months ago my original Goodyear tyres were done, after a good 40 thousand km. After quite some consideration I landed with the Pirelli Scorpion Zero All Season in 255/50 R20, largely based on the promise of their tyre labelling: A-B-A supposedly means very quiet, good wet traction, very low rolling resistance.
(Note that 2 versions of this particular tyre exist, the "right" ones are the 109W LR, designed specifically for the new LR Defender.)

Now, with 10 thousand km of experience, I am happy to share that those promises were not lies...

The tyres are quiet indeed, traction is fine (good enough for 2 skiing trips to Austria without any issue, in fact). But most impressed I am by their rolling resistance.
I observe a reduction of at least 1.5kWh/100km (or 2.5/100miles) compared to the Good Years. To put that in perspective, that is an efficiency improvement of around 9%, as if WLTP range increased with 40km, or as if the battery capacity grew from 90kWh to 98kWh... Qualifies for "pretty spectacular" in my book :cool:

I always felt that Jaguar did really well with the I-Pace, but they cut a few corners that they should not have cut.
One is that they took the wheels (mostly) from existing car series, making them look cool but creating high drag. Aerodynamic drag of the wheels+tyres accounts for about 25% of the entire vehicle drag, so it does really matter. That is why almost all EVs nowadays have specific wheels, far more closed than traditional alloys.
The other shortcut that Jaguar should not have taken, are the tyres. The OEM tyres chosen by Jaguar are not bad, typically they have a B label for rolling resistance. But for EVs, selecting A label tyres should be a no-brainer. Fortunately, this is an issue that we can fix as soon as the first set of tyres are worn out.

In short: I advise to pay attention to rolling resistance when choosing new rubber. It really matters!

For the moment there are not that many options in "our" sizes, but there is quite some progress. I'll try and share some findings
Mine came with Pirelli so maybe they heard you (-:
 

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This look very interesting as I am looking for tires to replace my originals goodyear (245x50x20)
I'm more concerned by less noise and less consumption than performances.
But I want to be sure they are homologated for the I-pace.
So u mean that some new I-pace delivered by jaguar are coming with those tires ?
 

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waiting for HSE caesium blue, bright pack, fully loaded without smoker's Pack ordered 15.3.2022
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On my order sheet the Goodyears are listed.
It's a MY 23 and should be delivered in July
 

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I was doing some googling on EV eco tyres and I'll give them a miss thanks. A few % extra range is not worth stopping distances being increased by well over a car length in wet conditions.

 

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No doubt that tyres and dimensions affect range. However, my experience is that it is not the most important factor. Average speed is by far the most important factor, followed by height diffenence, ambient temperature, wind and driving style. Then the tyres...

Driving home from skiing vacation in Sweden (600 km) I decided to follow the speed limits, which I usually don't do :devilish:. The result was a shocking 50 % range increase compared to previous trips on the same route! I achieved 470 km of real range, compared to my normal 310 km. The speed limit was a mix of 60, 80 and 110 km/h. Difference in height start-finish was 500 m decline. Temperature between 5-15 degrees Celsius. Calm driving style. Studless 18" winter tyres Nokian Hakkapeliitta R3.
 
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No doubt that tyres and dimensions affect range. However, my experience is that it is not the most important factor. Average speed is by far the most important factor, followed by height diffenence, ambient temperature, wind and driving style. Then the tyres...

Driving home from skiing vacation in Sweden I decided to follow the speed limits, which I usually don't do :devilish:. The result was a shocking 50 % range increase compared to previous trips on the same route! I achieved 470 km of real range, compared to my normal 310 km. The speed limit was a mix of 60, 80 and 110 km/h. Difference in height start-finish was 500 m decline. Temperature between 5-15 degrees Celsius. Calm driving style. Studless 18" winter tyres Nokian Hakkapeliitta R3.
All very true. A 5 mph reduction in speed will give a significant range increase with very little impact on driving time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
This look very interesting as I am looking for tires to replace my originals goodyear (245x50x20)
I'm more concerned by less noise and less consumption than performances.
But I want to be sure they are homologated for the I-pace.
So u mean that some new I-pace delivered by jaguar are coming with those tires ?
Hi Tophe,
What do you mean with homologated? Beyond the tyres that are delivered as OEM equipment, there is no further certification or homologation process. It sounds rather like somebody trying to charge more more than they should.
What is importance is to make sure tyres have a proper speed (V or more) and load rating (105 or more), and that they do not differ more than 3% up or down from the OEM tyres in total height.
Beyond that there is nothing legally defined for what tyres brand and type you would want to use.
 

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Some tyres have manufacturer-specific versions, some Pirelli and Dunlops have the 'J' mark to denote that fact. Other makes do this, to - Aston, Mercedes, Porsche, etc. J-marked tyres are generally about the same price as the non-marked ones, but, IME with Dunlop Maxx, they aren't the same compounds, tread, etc.
 

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I mean that I've a big crash (I hope not) with those tires, will my insurance work or not ? U know, where their are lot of money involved, insurances try to find any reason not to pay ...
Will jaguar validate them to be used on the I-Pace even if they are not in the documentation ?
 
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