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We all bemoan the shortage of (working!) 50kW Rapid Chargers, and hopefully Ionity/Shell/BP are going to plug (!) the gap soon, and give us 100kW ones too. But I do wonder how they're going to make any money from it.

To be useful, we need banks of 6,12, maybe more chargers per site, enough so that even at peak times, at least one will be empty. That implies a very low utilisation of very expensive kit. I don't know how much a 100kW DC charger costs, but it must be a lot. Then the infrastructure to supply the site with perhaps a MegaWatt of power. And utilities usually charge industrial users more on the basis of their peak power than their energy consumption. All of which adds up high up-front and running costs with poor utilisation and a dubious return on a very large investment.

I think we should expect to pay what may seem at face value to be "extortionate" prices for the use of very rapid chargers. Comparison with unit costs of electricity for home charging is not realistic or fair. We will be paying to save time, and even the most parsimonious of owners is probably prepared to pay, say, £25 extra for a 50kWh-hr charge achieved in 30mins rather than 1hr. That's 50p/unit premium over the accepted cost of a 50kW charge (30p/unit on Ecotricity if you can find a working one). I know Ionity's "launch price" is only £8 per session, but what will it be in 2019 or 2020?

But as most users will get 90% of their electricity from home charging, and as those that are using en route 100kW chargers frequently are probably business users whose time is even more valuable than recreational drivers, this shouldn't really worry us. But I think it is important that we are prepared to pay high prices, at least for a few years, to ensure we get the infrastructure. Once there is a surfeit of chargers, market forces will determine the "fair" price, which may come down again as the cost of the hardware reduces.

This is all just my personal opinion. What do others think?
 

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The word I hear is that level 3 DC chargers cost (in New World units) $100K and up. Don't know what part of that the gear is, but part of the cost is that first of all, you have to route in three-phase power, and then specialist electrical skills are required to install and connect this stuff, at these power ratings errors have lethal consequences.

As DougTheMac points out, you really only need fast chargers on highways to service the long-haul drivers, because the optimal time to charge is while you're sleeping, and L2 is fine for that. Which means that if we're going to be paying at a level that provides cost recovery, we're going to be paying quite a bit to recharge while on the long haul. For those of us who mostly drive around town and and only go cross-country on vacation, this is really not a big deal.

Having said that, the Tesla supercharger infrastructure, which is accounted for as sales support for the car brand, certainly looks like a fine piece of strategy. For people who do long-haul driving, a Tesla feels like a no-brainer choice. (I'm not one of those.)
 

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Izivia / Sodetrel ( EDF group) has deployed 200 x 50KW DC chargers along the motorways , I.e. one station ( = one charger ) every 80km.
Both in July and August 2018 the Izivia/Sodetrel network has been used more than 5000 times.
But in average over the year the use of a charger per day is inferior to 1 !
You are right DougTheMac,there is a business model issue .
 
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